U.S. Midlife Women Choosing Natural Health Care

Using Complementary and Alternative Approaches




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In a survey of 171 midlife American women, more than 80 percent reported using complementary and alternative medicine, Albert Einstein College of Medicine researchers discovered. The most common choice was herbal teas, followed by women’s vitamins, flaxseed, glucosamine and soy supplements. Only 34 percent of the non-Hispanic white women and 14 percent of the Hispanic women discussed it with their doctors.


This article appears in the May 2018 issue of Natural Awakenings.

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