A New Lease on Life

Mode’s Holistic Therapies Offer a Reboot of Mind and Body



Arvind Mani began pursuing a healthier lifestyle after reaching a breaking point of sorts. He was in his late 20s or early 30s, working a desk job for the Internal Revenue Service, and he couldn’t imagine what he would be like in 10 years. 

Like many of us, he would come home and unwind in front of the television, fall asleep late and wake up a few hours later, just to repeat everything all over again. He knew he had to do something to start feeling better. But despite trying different workout regimens, he says, he didn’t feel healthy enough to get healthy.

Mani was first introduced to the concept of sensory deprivation—now called float therapy—in 2008. Eight years later, as his curiosity in holistic services expanded, he opened Mode, a Pensacola wellness center that offers several mind-body services, including float therapy.

Time to Reboot

As we hustle to focus on our career, our family, our health or all of these things, we can forget to recharge our mind and body—something we must do in order to achieve our goals effectively, Mani says. The mind and body always work together, yet we tend to overwork one or the other. 

Mode Mind and Body, located at 3101 East Cervantes Street in Pensacola, specializes in rebooting the mind and body, and continuously recharging them, through holistic detoxification, relaxation and pain management. Mani and his staff meet with clients one-on-one to understand their concerns, from painful injuries to high stress, and recommend services that can improve their quality of life.

“The body runs automatically, without us really having to think about it,” he says. “So, how much are we doing to obstruct that process? How much are we doing to aid that process? Everything that we offer here aids the body in doing what it does naturally, and just frees up a lot of the obstructions. Each one of these services does something that the other services don’t.” 

He says many people find excuses not to improve their mental and physical well-being. They’ll say they don’t have the time, or they’ll start a tough diet or exercise and then quit in frustration. As they get older, they might simply accept their fate. Mode’s therapies are designed to restore people’s control over their health, Mani says. 

“Ultimately we all want to feel in control,” he notes. “We all want to feel that our health is predictable.” 

Mind-Body Therapies

The four therapies Mode offers can relieve common problems like back pain or the effects of a sedentary lifestyle, he says. The goal is to approach the problems holistically: centering the mind, calming the nervous system, increasing energy and relieving joint pain or stiffness.

Whole Body Sonic Vibration Therapy is designed to make up for all the movement we don’t do throughout the day. According to Mani, the therapy helps cleanse the body through the lymphatic system by boosting energy, immunity and overall mood. A 10-minute session will help flush out cellular waste and relax tight muscles in the neck, shoulders and back, he says. He recommends this therapy for people who sit for long periods of time, experience a lot of stress or suffer from chronic joint or muscle stiffness.

Far Infrared Sauna helps boost blood flow to improve sleep, clear the skin and reduce pain, stiffness and brain fog, Mani says. He recommends trying a 30-minute session after vibration therapy in order to heal damaged cells and reduce chronic inflammation with oxygen-rich blood.

Float Therapy is 60 minutes of relaxation in skin-temperature water that’s been super-saturated with 1,000 pounds of Epsom salt. Mani says “floating” allows the mind and body to reach a deep state of rest, reducing stress and chronic pain, increasing energy and enhancing sleep.

Magnetic Resonance Therapy is 60 minutes of relaxation in a Magnesphere, designed to target precise magnetic fields in the body in order to relax the nerves. According to Mani, this therapy provides lasting relief from several conditions, including injuries, headaches, nerve pain and PTSD.

Rebooting Begins at Home

Rebooting the mind and body is simpler than we think—and it begins at home, Mani says.

“People will always look for the magic bullet; they’re always going to sell the magic bullet,” he says. “But the first thing people need to do is start with sleep. Figure out a way to turn off your TV, turn off your cell phone, and just go to sleep.” 

Everyone is dealing with some form of addiction, he says, whether it’s food or technology. His advice to living a healthier life includes minimizing those bad habits: getting a good night’s rest, moving more, drinking more water and eating more fruits and vegetables. He also recommends cultivating a strong and positive support network and a sense of purpose.

“And don’t be afraid to be uncomfortable,” he adds. “Ultimately, if you stay comfortable your entire life, the great discomfort will come. Our bodies tell the truth. All the good stuff comes outside the comfort zone.”

For more information, visit ModeMindAndBody.com. See ad, page 26.

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