Light Pollution Disturbs Sleep

Outdoor Brightness Contributes to Insomnia




zhu difeng/Shutterstock.com

Being exposed to high levels of artificial outdoor light at night contributes to insomnia and greater use of sleeping pills, reports a new study from South Korea’s Seoul National University College of Medicine. The researchers studied the records of 52,027 people without diagnosed sleep disorders—60 percent of them women—and correlated their sleeping pill use with their residential location relative to artificial outdoor light intensity. The brighter the outdoor lighting, the more likely were sleep issues and the greater and more frequent use of sleeping pills. The study joins other research that has shown that artificial nighttime lighting—outdoors and indoors—disrupts circadian rhythms, potentially leading to such metabolic and chronic diseases and conditions as cancer, diabetes, obesity and depression.


This article appears in the March 2019 issue of Natural Awakenings.

 

 

Edit ModuleShow Tags

More from Natural Awakenings

The Emerald Coast Holistic Health Expo

Like everyone else in the Panhandle, Scott and Daralyn Chase have spent the months since Hurricane Michael recalibrating their lives. For the husband-and-wife publishers of Natural Awakenings in Northwest Florida, that process involved shifting the magazine’s signature event, the Emerald Coast Holistic Health Expo, from March to September.

Pensacola’s Only Certified Rolfer Furthers Training

​Sharalee Hoelscher has completed more than 300 hours of extra training to become the Pensacola area's only Certified Advanced Rolfer.

Drip Parlor Provides IV Hydration and Vitamin Therapy

Intravenous​ vitamin and hydration therapy, a growing trend in health and wellness, is now available locally at the Drip Parlor in Gulf Breeze.

Essential Oils Workshop Focuses on Boosting Immunity

ElemenTree Yoga, in Navarre, will host a dōTERRA Essential Oils “make and take” workshop designed to jump-start the immune-boosting process.

Feeding Healthy Habits

Today’s barrage of junk food ads can easily influence kids for the worse, but 10 strategies, including visiting farmers’ markets, teaching cooking skills and implementing device-free family meals, can help them choose to eat better.

Add your comment:

ADVERTISEMENT