Acetaminophen Linked to Delayed Language Skills

Pain Reliever Impacts Child's Development




Maridav/Shutterstock.com

Girls born to 754 Swedish mothers that used acetaminophen during pregnancy showed less ability in acquiring early language skills at 30 months of age, report Mount Sinai Health System study researchers. If the mothers took acetaminophen more than six times in early pregnancy, their daughters (but not their sons) were nearly six times more likely to have language delays than girls born to mothers that didn’t take the drug. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that 65 percent of pregnant women in this country use acetaminophen, which is marketed for pain and fever relief in Tylenol and Excedrin, and included in many over-the-counter formulations such as NyQuil and Robitussin.


This article appears in the May 2018 issue of Natural Awakenings.

Edit ModuleShow Tags

More from Natural Awakenings

Healthy Healing

Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation Naturally Treats Dementia and Depression

The Mind Performance Center, LLC, in Foley, Alabama provides non-drug rehabilitation for a wide range of brain disorders

Pure Pilates Hosts Day of Free Classes

Pure Pilates of Downtown Pensacola and Gulf Breeze will celebrate Pilates Day, May 5, by offering free 30-minute classes from 9 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., followed by free 30-minute private sessions from 12:30 to 2 p.m.

Pillow Self-Talk

Spending a few minutes each night with three purposeful questions will help us to rest content and awaken with joy.

Eco-Upgrades for America’s Landmarks

From the Grand Canyon to the Gateway Arch to the Empire State Building, America’s landmarks are making the old new again with Earth-friendly changes.

Add your comment:

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT