Recycling Crusade

San Francisco Moves Toward Zero Waste




Jakub Krechowicz/Shutterstock.com

The San Francisco Department of the Environment’s list of materials allowed in blue recycling bins has been expanded to include plastic bags, paper coffee cups, ice cream containers, milk or juice cartons and textiles; it is also downsizing refuse bins. It’s all part of a shift to using dual-compartment trucks to collect refuse from black bins and organic waste from green bins, with a dedicated truck for recyclables. A national leader in recycling, the city is one of the first to attempt a zero-waste target year of 2020.

California has a goal of 75 percent recycling by 2020, having achieved a 44 percent rate in 2016. Los Angeles is making progress with a new commercial waste recycling system. Washington, D.C., has also expanded its list of accepted materials for recycling bins, but still doesn’t include plastic bags. With recent improvements to automated and optical sorting technology, some companies are becoming more accommodating about what they will accept.


This article appears in the January 2018 issue of Natural Awakenings.

Edit ModuleShow Tags

More from Natural Awakenings

Santa Rosa Beach Business Offers Healthier Food Options

The idea for Caveman’s Cupboard, a modern paleo health food business in Santa Rosa Beach, began when Montana transplant Tony DeBlauw chatted with his co-worker Nick over their respective lunches—a sandwich and a salad.

Brava Hair Studio Moves to Navarre

Brava Hair Studio and Day Spa has made the move from Fort Walton Beach, its home for 13 years, to the Harvest Village shopping center in Navarre.

New Downtown Venue Brings Unique Mix to Pensacola

Ric Kindle has spent the last 18 months making a lifelong vision come to fruition. The Pensacola event coordinator, art crusader, yoga instructor and show promoter has transformed a historic car wash at 532 West Garden Street into Live!, a raw juice bar and an art and music venue.

How Pellet Therapy Restores Hormone Balance

Most people have a mental picture of someone who might need hormone therapy: a cranky, red-faced, middle-aged woman. But hormone imbalance can happen to both men and women of any age, says Karen Kennedy, M.D., a gynecologist with offices in Gulf Breeze and Navarre.

Feel Good - July 2018

Add your comment:

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT