Global Briefs Archive

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Fare Price

With strategies ranging from flying off-hours to clearing cookies from your computer, you can rack up savings on airfare.

Eco Sneakers

With a compostable sneaker made of cotton and corn, Reebok is moving to reduce the negative impact of shoes on the environment.

Saving Salmon

In response to a Native American tribal lawsuit, a court has ordered Washington State to remove culverts that block salmon from passing beneath roads.

Resource Saver

Building biodegradable bricks built with sand and bacteria depositing chemicals similar to the way coral grows is proving to be more energy efficient than cement manufacturing.

American Roots

In a move respectful of Native American history, some Oklahoma communities have changed Columbus Day to Indigenous Peoples’ Day.

Migrating Trees

Three-quarters of American tree species have shifted to the West since 1980 due to dryer conditions in the East and changing rainfall patterns.

Mold Gold

Instead of burning fallen tree leaves or carting them to the landfill, we can use them as mulch to enrich the soil and discourage pests.

Wildlife Wipeout

More than a million birds and bats are killed annually by wind turbines, but fatalities are cut if the turbines are located offshore and are turned off during low wind speeds.

Fast Foodies

The journal Pediatrics reports that children under the age of 2 are more likely to eat French fries than healthy vegetables on any given day and many eat no veggies at all.

Milk Muddle

A huge Colorado feedlot that supplies organic milk to Walmart and Costco has come under scrutiny after satellite imagery raised questions about whether it complies with outdoor grazing rules.

Plutonium Problem

To safely dispose of 56 million gallons of nuclear waste dating back to the Second World War, the Department of Energy might replace a glass-log encasement plan with a cement option.

Experiential Ed

Schools in Finland and New Orleans are pioneering new ways to involve students in a more collaborative education model.

Bat Banter

Computer algorithms helped Israeli researchers decode the language of Egyptian fruit bats and discover that bats exchange information about specific problems.

Free Wheeling

Easily movable mini-houses now range from the functional to the outlandish, including abodes mounted on tractors and shopping carts and ones attachable to rock faces.

Rolling Internet

A 40-foot-long Winnebago called the Digibus rolled through central California towns to train kids and adults in computer and job-searching skills.

Milkweed Mittens

Milkweed pods, which are five times lighter than synthetic insulation, are being tested by the Canadian Coast Guard as filler in prototype parkas, gloves and mittens.

Easy Mark

European supermarkets are cutting costs and saving energy by using high-tech lasers to mark prices on avocados, sweet potatoes and coconuts, with more to come.

Elder Force

The financially strapped National Park Service increasingly relies on volunteers to staff visitor centers and campsites, and a third of the workers are over age 54.

Accepted Misfits

Grocery stores are increasingly offering ugly-but-edible produce to customers at reduced prices instead of dumping them into a landfill.

Orca Finale

Under legal and activist pressure, SeaWorld is ending its theatrical killer whale shows and breeding program.

Tuna Turnaround

Levels of toxic mercury in Atlantic Bluefin tuna declined 19 percent between 2004 and 2012, a drop that scientists attribute to a shift from coal to natural gas and renewable energy.

Buzzing RoboBees

Harvard researchers have invented tiny robotic bees that may be able to eventually pollinate the crops that are under threat because of vanishing bee colonies.

Tea Time

Australian scientists are seeking citizens around the world to bury tea bags in wetlands to measure the rate as which the bags capture and store carbon.

Nature Rights

New Zealand and India have granted the legal status of personhood to vital rivers, forwarding an international movement that seeks to protect precious natural resources from corporate domination.

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